Don’t Quit Coffee Cold Turkey [and other tips from my first thirty days of drinking only water]

Don’t Quit Coffee Cold Turkey [and other tips from my first thirty days of drinking only water]

Well, I’m thirty days into my year of drinking only water and so far it’s been easier and harder than I expected [but mostly harder].

I’ll explain.

I started this whole thing in order to raise awareness about the 750+ million people without access to clean water and to improve my hydration and overall health. But, I have to be honest, I was totally unprepared for how this was going to affect my body.

I thought it would be easy because I only used to drink coffee in the mornings [every morning, but still] and an occasional cocktail or hard seltzer when we’re out [I’m a total health freak, don’t forget]. The rest of the time I drink water. No smoothies, no lattes, no soda. Ever. So, I figured this would be a piece of cake.

Not so, my friend.

I spent the first half of January in such bad pain that I couldn’t sleep without painkillers. [And folks, I never take pain meds. I birthed four babies without so much as a Tylenol.] It wasn’t until day seven that I could manage during the day without taking anything, and it was on day ten when I attempted to go to bed without ibuprofen…which turned out to be a big mistake. I was up all night thinking maybe I was dying [or had caught Covid] and I finally wisened up and looked into symptoms of caffeine withdrawal. Lo and behold! There are a lot more negative side affects than just the little headaches I had anticipated.

So, my first tip is:

Tip #1: Don’t Quit Coffee Cold Turkey

To clarify, don’t quit caffeine cold turkey. If you drink the decaf stuff…more power to you.

Coffee was my only source of caffeine [other than occasional dark chocolate], so when I quit coffee all of a sudden, I experienced a range of miserable side affects.

The worse affect was painful full-body aches. The kind of aching you get when you have the flu, except I felt perfectly fine in every other way. It was such a low, dull pain deep in my bones [and everywhere else] that I could barely function. [Don’t worry – I’m a mom. I functioned anyway].

I also had headaches every day for a loooooong time. [In reality, it just felt like a long time because when you have a headache time really creeps by.] And they were the worst headaches I’ve ever experienced – but that’s not saying much because I rarely get headaches. [Like one a year, I’m not kidding.]

The other obvious and expected side affect of caffeine withdrawal was exhaustion. And I mean exhaustion. I felt like I was back in the first few weeks of pregnancy when I could barely get off the couch. Oh man, it was bad. Thankfully, that didn’t last as long, but it did last long enough for me to consider buying caffeine pills [I didn’t].

Other side affects that I did not experience are moodiness [okay, maybe a little, but can you blame me?!], nausea, trouble concentrating, and other flu-like symptoms like vomiting [thank goodness I was spared that experience].

So, take it from me, ease off the caffeine. This probably goes without saying, but withdrawal is no fun. I was only drinking maybe twenty ounces a day every day for the past eighteen months [since I gave birth to my last baby]. That was apparently plenty to become totally addicted to the stuff. Which leads me to my next tip…

Tip #2: Definitely Quit Caffeine

Caffeine in coffee may seem harmless, but if a substance has the ability to make me feel that miserable when I stop imbibing it, it’s probably not a good thing to consume on an every day basis. And I know people [from my 3AM UPS job] who practically lived on energy drinks.

This is no bueno.

I’m not saying that drinking coffee is bad for you [there are actually some benefits to drinking coffee], but drinking too much is definitely not a good idea.

How much is too much?

🤷‍♀️

[I think the recommended MAX in America is 400mg a day.]

For me, I will probably just switch to decaf after this year [if I drink it at all], because, honestly, I found something infinitely better than caffeine, which leads me to my third tip…

Tip #3: Generate Your Own Energy

Most people I know drink coffee or caffeinated drinks for the energy. That’s why I always dragged myself from my bed to the coffee maker first thing every morning, my eyes barely open, my kids whining for breakfast. “Mommy doesn’t function without coffee, kiddos.”

But, shocker, I actually do function without coffee! In fact, I have found a much more effective, longer-lasting and healthier alternative to the cup o’ joe and it’s called exercise!

Yeah, that’s right. A good ol’ heart-pumping, legs-moving, sweat-dripping workout session does way more for my energy levels than my coffee ever did. I wake up, workout, and feel great all day.

I don’t need to go into all the other benefits of daily exercise [trust me, they are plentiful], but working out in the morning is simply the best because it gives you a natural energy boost [and it gives you a really great psychological mood-boost when you’re workout is already done for the day, can I get an Amen?!?].

Speaking of starting your day off right, here’s another good tip…

Tip #4: Start Your Day with Water

First thing I do when I wake up is pee. [I think this is a universal thing.] So, the second thing I do is drink water. This has helped me to establish the habit of water in the morning [something that is new to me] and makes me feel a lot better.

Is there science to support drinking water first thing in the morning? I dunno. I’m just telling you that I feel much better now that I start my day with water – less groggy, less tired, more alert and ready for my day.

Also, I have a really big water intake goal, so I have to get started early if I have any hope of drinking enough water throughout my day.

And that brings me to my fifth tip…

Tip #5: Figure Out How Much Water You Need

There doesn’t seem to be an exact science for determining how much water an individual body needs; however, there are lots of opinions and good advice out there.

The old rule is eight 8-ounce glasses a day.

Then I learned that the correct amount is half an ounce per pound of body weight [during personal trainer certification studies], but it’s been expanded to a range of half to one ounce per pound of body weight. For me, that would mean 68-135 ounces of water a day. That seems like a really big range and it also doesn’t account for exercise, which would require more water.

In reality, I never paid much attention to the number of ounces. I always had a goal to drink two full 32oz bottles of water [I use my refillable gofiltr bottle]. But for this month, I went looking for a more specific number of ounces I could aim for each day. I put some info into a calculator that also asked me how much time I spend exercising each day and I got an answer of 102 ounces.

So I need to be drinking almost three and a half 32oz bottles of water.

The good news is, without drinking coffee and drinking water right away in the morning, I generally don’t have any trouble hitting that goal. The bad news is…well, see my final tip below:

Tip #6: Prepare to Pee A LOT

🚽

Yeah, I think that’s all that needs to be said on that subject.

In the beginning, I said that drinking only water was also easier than I expected. After only one month, I don’t crave coffee or cocktails or smoothies or anything else. I haven’t accidentally picked up a beverage other than water and taken a swig [as I was fearful I might in the beginning]. I think I’m actually quite happy with water. Who know? This may become a lifelong commitment.

Happy Hydrating!

💦💦💦

Karis

Lessons in Motherhood and [Not] Accepting My Postpartum Body

Lessons in Motherhood and [Not] Accepting My Postpartum Body

I originally intended to write about how I learned to accept my postpartum body – until I realized that I most definitely did NOT accept my postpartum body. And, honestly, that’s okay.

But first, a [lengthy] preface.

The Preface

I recently read Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis and Hunger by Roxane Gay. Both of these women endured trauma – like earth-shattering, heart-breaking, I-cannot-even-imagine-going-through-that kind of trauma – and both women responded very differently. [Theirs are not my stories to share, but you can check out their books to see what I mean.] Reading their very personal stories from their own perspectives gave me some perspective of my own – and reminded me of two very important things regarding body image issues.

We are all different.

These women responded differently, and society would have us believe that one was right and the other wrong. But, that is not the case. Their responses were different because [DUH!] they are different people.

One of the biggest mistakes we make regarding the human body is to assume that there is a one-size-fits all way to look, eat, exercise and be healthy. Every human body is unique and has to be treated differently. And every human body is occupied by a different soul that is dealing with real life shit [excuse my language, mom] that will have an effect on their body. That’s ok. There is no set standard, set weight, set body fat percentage, set pant size or anything else that everyone must strive to reach. The standard of health – what it looks like and what it takes to achieve it – will be different for every human being.

Because, look, we are all different.

We are all complicated.

I’m going to share my personal journey and my perspective, but I will be the first to admit that this stuff is complicated because we are complicated. It’s not as simple as just eating a 1,200 calorie diet and spending 30 minute on a treadmill each day. There is so much more that goes into health and wellness, so much societal pressure to conform, so much baggage we have to carry around, so much pain and fear and anxiety – and all of it affects our bodies. We cannot expect to find simple answers – or that the answer we find for ourselves will be the answer for everyone.

But, we do have to find that truth for ourselves.

My Truth for My Body

My truth is that I am happiest when I am healthiest – and that means exercising regularly, eating clean and getting enough sleep.

Fitting into my jeans is just a perk.

Before I had babies, I worked really hard for four years to become the healthiest version of myself. I started running [and back then I HATED running]. I learned to cook [and man, I REALLY HATED cooking]. I cut back on the alcohol consumption [and I REALLY LOVE sangria] and fast food consumption [and I REALLY REALLY REALLY LOVE French fries].

But I was terrified that these healthy habits that I worked so hard to establish would be derailed by having a baby. I was terrified that I would never lose the dreaded “baby weight.”

[I’m super ashamed to admit this because “baby weight” – or gaining any weight – is a privilege that many do not get to enjoy. But that is my truth.]

With each of my four pregnancies I gained 50-60 pounds. And after I had each of those babies, I knew that for me to get back to the level of health and energy and activity that I love so much, I needed to lose that weight.

So, I chose to change my postpartum body rather than accept it.

But, at the same time, I have accepted the things I cannot control.

I’m fine with my stretch marks and my wrinkly stomach and stretched out belly-button, and all that. [It’s a little weird but I actually like my stretch marks because I intend to have a badass body again and stretch marks will be the only proof that this body birthed four babies.]

I guess what I’m trying to say is that there is nothing wrong with wanting to change your body – or improve yourself in any way. I want to love myself, but I also want to work on myself. I accept that I’m not perfect, but that doesn’t mean I can’t improve. I will never have the perfect body or be perfectly healthy, but that is not an excuse to not do what I can.

Of course, as a personal trainer, my wish is for everyone to be on a journey to their healthiest self – but I also recognize that some people are on different journeys, pursuing other things. And that’s ok. The other side of this issue is that we never have the right to judge another person’s journey.

I hope whatever journey you are on it is in pursuit of your best self – whatever that may look like for you.

❤️ ❤️ ❤️

Karis